Research Associate in Biomarkers in Neurodegeneration

University of Oxford

United Kingdom

August 10, 2022

Description

Research Associate in Biomarkers in Neurodegeneration

Kavli Institute for Nanoscience Discovery, New Biochemistry Building, Oxford, UK

We are seeking an ambitious and highly motivated post-doctoral scientist to work in a programme of research that aims to identify biomarkers for Parkinson's disease stratification. The study builds on previous research by the group in this area and involves the study of extracellular vesicles derived from iPSC-based models and patient samples. As such, the post will offer an excellent opportunity for mechanistic research and biomarker discovery in Parkinson's disease using state-of-the-art models and facilities available at the Kavli Institute for Nanoscience Discovery and Nuffield Department of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Oxford. The post- holder will also benefit from and be exposed to interactions with Industry and work alongside a multidisciplinary team in the Molecular Neurodegeneration Research Group.

You will have a PhD/DPhil or equivalent degree in Chemistry, Biochemistry or Biotechnology and Publications in Biomarker studies. It is essential to have experience in handling of patient biosamples as well as Previous use of “-omics” in biomarker discovery. Experience in molecular or cellular biology is a desirable.

The post is full time for a fixed term of 2 years in the first instance.

Only applications received before 12.00 midday on 10.08.2022 will be considered. Interviews will be held as soon as possible thereafter.

Contact Person : HR Team Vacancy ID : 158990 Contact Phone : Closing Date & Time : 10-Aug-2022 12:00 Pay Scale : STANDARD GRADE 7 Contact Email : recruitment@ndcn.ox.ac.uk Salary (£) : 33309 - 40927

About the employer

The University of Oxford is the oldest university in the English-speaking world, and is actually so ancient that its founding date is unknown – though it is thought that teaching took place there as early as the 11th century. It’s...