LEO Intermittent Lecturer

University of Michigan

United States

November 21, 2021

Description

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Course Description

In this course, we will teach how epidemiologists study the frequency, patterns, and determinants ofhealth in different populations. Students can expect to learn: -The terminology, principles, andmethods of population-based epidemiologic research. -How to critically appraise epidemiologicalresearch. The course will be divided into the following three sections: -Section 1 will serve as anintroduction as to the way in which epidemiologists measure and describe trends in morbidity andmortality as well as the risk factors for these endpoints. In this section we ask: What are the trends?Do they differ by time or place? Where do we get the data to study these trends and how do we knowif our information is any good? -In Section 2, students will learn how epidemiologists conduct studiesto try to understand causality. Here we address the following questions: What is causality? How do wedesign studies to determine if something increases or reduces the risk of morbidity or mortality? Whatare the measures that we use to characterize associations and how certain we are in those estimates?-Section 3 teaches students to identify situations in which the data that we collect in epidemiologicalstudies can mislead us and lead us to reach the wrong conclusions. Students will learn different typesof problems that can bias our conclusions and will develop instincts as to the directionality andmagnitude of these biases.Learning Objectives: -Calculate and interpret measures of event frequency to describe populationpatterns of health-related risk factors and health-related outcomes in terms of person, place, and time.-Identify an unusual occurrence of disease or illness (e.g., an outbreak or disease cluster). -Recognizethe characteristics that help to define causality. -Describe the characteristics of different study designs.-Choose an appropriate study design for a research question. -Calculate and interpret measures ofassociation between risk factors and outcomes. -Compare the strengths and weaknesses of differentstudy designs to assess causality. -Identify sources of bias that can influence epidemiological findings.-Predict directionality of known biases. -Understand basic tools of causal inference in epidemiology. -Critically appraise and analyze the weight of evidence for causal associations.

Responsibilities

We are looking for an experienced instructor to teach Epidemiological Methods, EPID 590.In this course, we will teach how epidemiologists study the frequency, patterns, and determinants of health indifferent populations. Students can expect to learn: -The terminology, principles, and methods of populationbasedepidemiologic research. -How to critically appraise epidemiological research. The course will be dividedinto the following three sections: -Section 1 will serve as an introduction as to the way in whichepidemiologists measure and describe trends in morbidity and mortality as well as the risk factors for theseendpoints. In this section we ask: What are the trends? Do they differ by time or place? Where do we get thedata to study these trends and how do we know if our information is any good? -In Section 2, students willlearn how epidemiologists conduct studies to try to understand causality. Here we address the followingquestions: What is causality? How do we design studies to determine if something increases or reduces therisk of morbidity or mortality? What are the measures that we use to characterize associations and howcertain we are in those estimates? -Section 3 teaches students to identify situations in which the data that wecollect in epidemiological studies can mislead us and lead us to reach the wrong conclusions. Students willlearn different types of problems that can bias our conclusions and will develop instincts as to thedirectionality and magnitude of these biases.This course will be taught remotely.

Required Qualifications

PhD in Epidemiology, Public Health, or related field, or an equivalent combination of a relevant advanceddegree and experience.

Desired Qualifications

Experience teaching graduate level course. Experience using Canvas.

Additional Information

Approximately 1,650 full and part-time university lecturers are represented by the Lecturers' EmployeeOrganization, AFT Local 6244. These non-tenure-track instructional-staff play an important role advancing theuniversity's education mission, teaching a wide range of courses on all three university campuses. Lecturerscovered by this contract are eligible for the university's comprehensive benefits package for faculty and staff,including university- sponsored health care and retirement savings plans, paid time off, professionaldevelopment funding and other benefits.Compensation will follow the established salary rates specified in the LEO contract (base salary of $51,000FTE). This position will require a 25% appointment from May 2, 2022 through June 10, 2022.Job openings are posted for a minimum of seven calendar days. The review and selection process maybegin as early as the eighth day after posting. This opening may be removed from posting boards and filledany time after the minimum posting period has ended.A cover letter is required for consideration for this position and should be attached as the first page of yourresume/CV.Michigan Public Health is seeking a dynamic staff member with a commitment to contributingto a diverse, equitable and inclusive environment for all members of our community.

Union Affiliation

This position is covered under the collective bargaining agreement between the U-M and the Lecturers Employee Organization, AFL-CIO, which contains and settles all matters with respect to wages, benefits, hours and other terms and conditions of employment.

Background Screening

The University of Michigan conducts background checks on all job candidates upon acceptance of a contingent offer and may use a third party administrator to conduct background checks. Background checks are performed in compliance with the Fair Credit Reporting Act.

U-M EEO/AA Statement

The University of Michigan is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.

U-M COVID-19 Vaccination Policy

COVID-19 vaccinations are now required for all University of Michigan students, faculty and staff across all three campuses, including Michigan Medicine. This includes those working or learning remotely. More information on this policy is available on the Campus Blueprint website or the U-M Dearborn and U-M Flint websites.

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